Chinese culture on dating

Traditionally, the instrument was simply referred to as the "qin" (琴) but by the twentieth century the term had come to be applied to many other musical instruments as well: the yangqin hammered dulcimer, the huqin family of bowed string instruments, and the Western piano are examples of this usage. Other incorrect classifications, mainly from music compact discs, include "harp" or "table-harp".

The prefix "gu-" (古; meaning "ancient") was later added for clarification. The guqin is a very quiet instrument, with a range of about four octaves, and its open strings are tuned in the bass register.

People from the same school trained under the same master may have different individual styles (such as Zhang Ziqian and Liu Shaochun of the Guangling school).

There is a difference between qin schools and qin societies.

The qin is also capable of a lot of harmonics, of which 91 are most commonly used and indicated by the dotted positions.

Such schools generally formed around areas where qin activity was greatest.

Some schools have come and gone, and some have offshoots (such as the Mei'an school, a Zhucheng school offshoot).

Some are mostly philosophical or artistic musings, others are scientific and technical.

As with any other musical tradition, there are differences in ideals and interaction between different people.

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